I am Anthony E. Savvides. This is my blog.

Reflections & adventures of a writer at heart, a journalist by trade and a waiter by night.

Posts Tagged ‘Constantinople

Uncovered mosaics at famed Hagia Sophia have art historians anxious to fully restore this national gem

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Story and photos by Anthony Savvides

ISTANBUL, Turkey – It began in 1993 – a massive effort to stabilize and restore an architectural gem dating back to the 6th century. But today, a year after the Ministry of Culture and Tourism declared the project finished, there remains concern that work on the Hagia Sophia Museum is still not complete.

“Now, the restoration process has ended, maybe [due to] money problems. There may be some political agendas, too,” said Aslihan Erkman, a professor of art history at Istanbul Technical University who believes that the efforts should have continued.

A recent discovery in the apse, uncovered during the most recent restoration of Hagia Sophia. The angel was found by restoration workers in the summer of 2009.

Before the latest restoration efforts began, a mission to Turkey by United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, or UNESCO, noted falling plaster, dirty marble facings, decorative paintings damaged by moisture and ill-maintained lead roofing. Progress was clearly made, but not enough, according to some observers.

In 2008, two years before work stopped on the space, Zeynep Ahunbay, a professor of architecture at Istanbul Technical University, talked of her frustration with the process.

“For months at a time, you don’t see anybody working,” Ahunbay told Smithsonian Magazine in 2008. “One year there is a budget, the next year there is none. We need a permanent restoration staff, conservators for the mosaics, frescoes and masonry, and we need to have them continuously at work.”

That’s one view of the project. Others watching during the nearly two decades of work – and after the scaffolding came down – talked of the somewhat complicated history of the space. Visible for miles across the city, the Hagia Sophia is a symbol of Istanbul’s history as well as its cultural and religious clashes.

The extravagant buttresses, grand dome and four brick minarets, towering toward the sky, have been a prominent feature of the city’s skyline since the 6th century, when it was completed in 537. This historic, grandiose landmark intertwines the legacies of medieval Christianity and Islam, and those of the Byzantine and Ottoman Empires.

A view of a few of the Islamic elements within Hagia Sophia, which were installed on top of and above the altar after the Ottomon conquest of the city in 1453.

Until the fall of the Byzantine Empire to the Ottomans in 1453, Hagia Sophia served as the religious heart and core of the empire. After the Ottoman conquest of the former Byzantine capital, the building was turned into a mosque, which it remained until the early 20th century. In 1931, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, the country’s first president and founder of the Republic of Turkey, closed Hagia Sophia and secularized it.

>>Click here to continue reading the story.

Written by AESavvides

June 13, 2011 at 5:11 am

After a long night…

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After a long, long night and early morning spent with the gang, my first story from Istanbul has been posted!  I wrote about recent restoration efforts to the Hagia Sophia Museum in Istanbul.  Click the link below to check it out:

Uncovered mosaics at famed Hagia Sophia have art historians anxious to fully restore this national gem

 

Meanwhile, I’m not in the clear just yet.  I’m still hard at work, completing my final story from Istanbul.  Be sure to keep checking back here, you won’t want to miss my last story!

Everyone is all packed up by now, and I am at the hotel buffet with some friend chowing down on our final (unimaginative, boring, lame… insert more “I’m-so-sick-of-this-food” adjectives here) breakfast of this Dialogue of Civilizations program.  We will depart the hotel and head for Ataturk International Airport 30 mintues from riiiight…. Now.

 

Written by AESavvides

June 13, 2011 at 5:01 am